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North-South RandD Spillovers [electronic resource] / Elhanan Helpman.

By: Helpman, Elhanan.
Contributor(s): Coe, David T | Helpman, Elhanan | Hoffmaister, Alexander W.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: IMF Working Papers; Working Paper: No. 94/144Publisher: Washington, D.C. : International Monetary Fund, 1994Description: 1 online resource (36 p.).ISBN: 1451856385 :.ISSN: 1018-5941.Subject(s): Industrial Countries | Total Factor Productivity | Cameroon | China, People's Republic of | Congo, Democratic Republic of the | Guinea | JapanAdditional physical formats: Print Version:: North-South RandD SpilloversOnline resources: IMF e-Library | IMF Book Store Abstract: We examine the extent to which developing countries that do little, if any, research and development themselves benefit from R&D that is performed in the industrial countries. By trading with an industrial country that has a large "stock of knowledge" from its cumulative R&D activities, a developing country can boost its productivity by importing a larger variety of intermediate products and capital equipment embodying foreign knowledge, and by acquiring useful information that would otherwise be costly to obtain. Our empirical results, which are based on observations over the 1971-90 period for 77 developing countries, suggest that R&D spillovers from the industrial countries in the North to the developing countries in the South are substantial.
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We examine the extent to which developing countries that do little, if any, research and development themselves benefit from R&D that is performed in the industrial countries. By trading with an industrial country that has a large "stock of knowledge" from its cumulative R&D activities, a developing country can boost its productivity by importing a larger variety of intermediate products and capital equipment embodying foreign knowledge, and by acquiring useful information that would otherwise be costly to obtain. Our empirical results, which are based on observations over the 1971-90 period for 77 developing countries, suggest that R&D spillovers from the industrial countries in the North to the developing countries in the South are substantial.

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